Jeanne Kelly

Posts Tagged ‘communication’

Google Art Project | As an Artist

In Thesis Research, Wow on February 14, 2011 at 12:27 pm

I think this is brilliant, wonderful.

Who ever gets to see these works of art this up close?

Very few people are allowed to study these collections in this way. And rightly so. Too many visitors getting as close as Google Art Project does would destroy a work of art in no time. Yet it’s one of those many things I want to do in museums that’s not allowed; getting up close and studying the hand of the artist.

I learn a lot from being up close. I used to look at engraving stones and etching plates with a magnifying glass. But that was my own work. I love that I can now see these in this works of art way.

But I’m interested to hear what the museums and galleries have to say. There will never be a replacement for the original, but when the original isn’t avalible and certainly can’t be examined this closely by a million people all the time. [that would surely destroy it]   A certain distance is important for the life and health of the work and the viewer. In a way, the fragility of the piece, the unique nature of it being a one of a kind, gives it a life we must protect. There will never be another van Gogh’s The Bedroom and I may never be able to get it.

If museums get really desperate, they could sell personal viewings to a few people to help them pay the rent. But a few other people might get angry over that, maybe the people who couldn’t afford it.

Seems to me a double edged sword. A museum’s greatest competition can be the wealthy elite. They drive and sustain the price of art; they are who the museums bid against.  At the same time, they provide free labor, funding and donate entire collections to museums. Tricky, tricky. I understand that I’m oversimplifying a complex problem, but I think it has a simple relevance here. Who gets what kind of access?

And, what’s in the best interest of the work?  Should everyone, no one, only a few people a year, be allowed to get breath on Rembrandt’s Self Portrait. Whatever the right answer, Google says it’s everyone.

For now the following museums are included in the project:

  • Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, Washington DC – USA
  • The Frick Collection, NYC – USA
  • Gemäldegalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC – USA
  • MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, NYC – USA
  • Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid – Spain
  • Museo Thyssen – Bornemisza, Madrid – Spain
  • Museum Kampa, Prague – Czech Republic
  • National Gallery, London – UK
  • Palace of Versailles – France
  • Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
  • The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg – Russia
  • State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow – Russia
  • Tate Britain, London – UK
  • Uffizi Gallery, Florence – Italy
  • Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
Here’s a little more about it in Google’s own words:
What is the ‘Art Project’?
A unique collaboration with some of the world’s most acclaimed art museums to enable people to discover and view more than a thousand artworks online in extraordinary detail.

  • Explore museums with Street View technology:virtually move around the museum’s galleries, selecting works of art that interest you, navigate though interactive floor plans and learn more about the museum and you explore.
  • Artwork View: discover featured artworks at high resolution and use the custom viewer to zoom into paintings. Expanding the info panel allows you to read more about an artwork, find more works by that artist and watch related YouTube videos.
  • Create your own collection: the ‘Create an Artwork Collection’ feature allows you to save specific views of any of the 1000+ artworks and build your own personalised collection. Comments can be added to each painting and the whole collection can then be shared with friends and family.
Are the images on the Art Project site copyright protected?
The high resolution imagery of artworks featured on the art project site are owned by the museums, and these images may be subject to copyright laws around the world. The Street View imagery is owned by Google. All of the imagery on this site is provided for the sole purpose of enabling you to use and enjoy the benefit of the art project site, in the manner permitted by Google’s Terms of Service.The normal Google Terms of Service apply to your use of the entire site.
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The Hyrtl Simulacrum on Kick It!

In Thesis Research, Wow on February 13, 2011 at 6:46 pm

A few days ago I started getting a few more hits and pledges on the Kickstarter page and was wondering what was going on.  Whatever was happening, I liked it and wanted to make sure it kept happening. So I did a little digging. I found out that a collaborative group had picked up my project and was helping to promote it on their website.  Alright. {!} The group is really a creative conference called Kick It! and is associated with Lab 24/7, an “underground space and incubator for creative projects and events” operating from the cellar of an old brownstone in BedStuy. They have the project prominently featured on their front page under “Projects We Like.”   Wow!   A very humble Thank You to you folks.

But let me let them tell you about the conference in their own words …

“KICK IT! is an afternoon of presentations, performances and exercises focused on getting projects off the ground. KICK IT! is about motivating and connecting people who want to get things done.  If that sounds like you, then keep reading… At the heart of KICK IT! is a series of demo’s by individuals and groups that are actively starting up a project, business or community effort.  The projects could be an album release, a cookbook, the invention of a new water gun, or a conference around a cause.  Based on the demo’s, the audience will vote for their favorite project, who’ll receive a cash prize. Getting things done requires learning from the mistakes, and successes, of others. So you’ll also hear advice from people who’ve hit the nail on the head, and others who miscalculated. And if you have an idea, we’ll give you an opportunity to pitch it, and match you up with other people who may want to help *you* KICK IT! That will take the form of concept lightening pitches, followed by team matchmaking. So if you have an idea that you want support on, bring your one minute schpiel. Get ready for a collaborative experience that will inspire you to cross that chasm between procrastination and action.  Because the time is now for entrepreneurs, artists, and creatives to take hold of the 21st century.  The time is now to Kick It!”

I’d received a comment/compliment from one of the folks from a group a few days ago but the link to the site wasn’t working at that time. I tried to fine it myself on the interwebs, but I had no luck and it kind of got placed on the back burner.  But not anymore!  I applied to present on March 19th, so we’ll see how it goes.  Until then: Thanks Jonathan Landau for the props. 🙂

Submedia | Concentric Zoetrope

In Uncategorized on February 8, 2011 at 1:15 am

A concentric zoetrope is essentially a cylinder within a  cylinder. The inner cylinder consists of images facing outward. The outer cylinder is solid except for small slits cut in evenly spaced increments around its circumference, like murder holes in the siege tower. These slits are what allow you to not just see the images on the inner cylinder, but they help to create the illusion animation.

For the second construction I needed to improve on the construction. I used much more flexible material.  I also enclosed the gaps along the bottom to create a solid backdrop in case I might want to use this for a standard zoetrope in the future.

The inner cylinder is supported by pressure.  I used the same images as in the first zoetrope for the reasons I stated in the first post, I want to concentrate on the mechanics. I recalculated the size of these images to fit the smaller cylinder and printed them out on the plotter. After taping the images into shape I measured the circumference of this new cylinder and cut to precise circles from foamcore to hold the cylinder rigid.

What I found to be as crucial in a concentric search rope as in the regular ones is lighting. Whereas the first one I made did not have enough light duty to its solid ceiling the second one seemed to have first have to much. Again I found that it was crucial not to have the outside of the mechanism lit.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19691830&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

I think the second one was pretty successful after watching the video and that doesn’t really do the piece justice. I really do think a lot of it is the lighting. And I am going to try and make the Tron face.

Also, here are a few of the “animation” from the Museum of the Moving Image.
http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19692479&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

In Spring 2010, Thesis Research on January 31, 2011 at 11:39 am

The symposium “Modern a/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet” is being present in conjunction with  a new exhibition called “Working in Wonder” at the Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University. Here’s a bit of the press release:

“Working in Wonder,” a group exhibition, curated by Erin Gray, Danielle Schallom, and Edward Stapley-Brown, will be on view at The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University from January 18 through February 11, 2011.

“Working in Wonder” includes artwork in various media by artists that have been inspired by the Curiosity Cabinet, a historical era of collecting occurring between 1500 and 1700. The exhibit explores the connection between man-made and natural objects or artificialia and naturalia.

A symposium, Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet, will take place in conjunction with the exhibition. Lawrence Weschler, author of Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, will give a keynote speech on “ A Natural History of Wonder.” Other speakers will discuss topics such as Joseph Cornell, The Morbid Anatomy Library, and the work of Damien Hirst. The symposium will be held on the first floor of the Walsh Library in the Beck Room directly across from the Walsh Gallery.

The Walsh Gallery is located on the campus of Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079. For more information call 973-275-2033 or jeanne.brasile@shu.edu. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10:30am to 4:30pm.

Please RSVP for the symposium by calling 973-761-7966 or emailing museumgrad@shu.edu. All events are free and open to the public.

There was a bit of confusion  (on my part)  as to whether or not the gallery would be open  during the symposium. Their normal operating hours do not include Saturdays. I confirmed with the University today that the Walsh Gallery and the “Working in Wonder” exhibition will indeed be open to the public during the symposium.

I thought I should also mention, that although I’ll be attending the entire symposium, anyone who would like to sit in for only one or two of the lectures, or would simply like to go to the gallery show, please  feel free to join us join us.

Update on the Seton Hall Symposium

In Thesis Research on January 31, 2011 at 11:39 am

The symposium “Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet” is being present in conjunction with  a new exhibition called “Working in Wonder” at the Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University. Here’s a bit of the press release:

Paul Stout, The New American Landscape

“Working in Wonder” includes artwork in various media by artists that have been inspired by the Curiosity Cabinet, a historical era of collecting occurring between 1500 and 1700. The exhibit explores the connection between man-made and natural objects or artificialia and naturalia.

A symposium, Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet, will take place in conjunction with the exhibition. Lawrence Weschler, author of Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, will give a keynote speech on “ A Natural History of Wonder.” Other speakers will discuss topics such as Joseph Cornell, The Morbid Anatomy Library, and the work of Damien Hirst. The symposium will be held on the first floor of the Walsh Library in the Beck Room directly across from the Walsh Gallery.

The Walsh Gallery is located on the campus of Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079. For more information call 973-275-2033 or jeanne.brasile@shu.edu. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10:30am to 4:30pm.

Please RSVP for the symposium by calling 973-761-7966 or emailing museumgrad@shu.edu. All events are free and open to the public.

There was a bit of confusion  (on my part)  as to whether or not the gallery would be open  during the symposium. Their normal operating hours do not include Saturdays. I confirmed with the University today that the Walsh Gallery and the “Working in Wonder” exhibition will indeed be open to the public during the symposium.

I thought I should also mention, that although I’ll be attending the entire symposium, anyone who would like to sit in for only one or two of the lectures, or would simply like to go to the gallery show, please  feel free to join us join us.

Kickstarter Video

In Spring 2010, Thesis Research on January 29, 2011 at 6:48 pm

I wanted to make a video for the project home page on Kickstarter. There is so much to read on there already that it was suggested something a little more dynamic would be nice. And sometimes it’s just nice to be told a story while you look at pictures.  🙂 So I finally got it completed, up and running. click on the image below to watch the video.

 

Word of the Day

In Spring 2010, Thesis Research on January 23, 2011 at 11:41 am

Diorama

First came the panorama, a late 18th century word so successful that it spawned two others on its pattern: cyclorama, and today’s word, diorama.

The dio- part is from Greek dia, “through,” reflecting the fact that the earliest dioramas were viewed through a hole or opening. The common -orama part is from Greek, horama, “sight.” All three words denote paintings or displays of various kinds.

To look up the word of the day everyday visit the Thinkmap Visual Thesaurus.

Prototyping the Mechanism

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on January 16, 2011 at 11:06 pm

Geometry and Gears

I had not used this particular set of tools in a long time and it felt good to get them out and work with geometry again. I got this set during my second year in college and it has more then past the test of time, that extension are is perfect for this job.

The first few prototypes for the turntable’s gearing where pretty unsuccessful.  My biggest problem is simply making something sturdy enough. I was given a great book for beginners in gears and simple analog mechanical movements.  This helped with understanding the basics and getting started with figuring out the ratio.  I also had to start thinking about the placement and accessibility of the handle and how each user is going to experience the function.

Coat-hangers, cardboard and foam-core don’t seem to cut it, they’re all too flimsy to last longer then a few turns and even those struggle to move the diorama.  Nothing I’ve put together so far moves very smoothly, but that’s the point of prototyping, right?  I like the 1:1 ration for rith now, it’s more intuitive to “scroll” through the scenes at this 1:1 movement.

I also decided to allow the gears to work in both directions.  This allows the viewer to “rewind” the narrative.  They can return to what they have already seen or actually view the entire thing in revere. This is one less restriction to the narrative.

There is no question that I’m going to need the construction to be much more substantial.  Not only to support the weight of the diorama itself, but to support the force required to also turn the thing smoothly and effortlessly.  In the second or third iteration of the gears I replace all the cardboard shafts with wooden ones.  This improved the stability and tremendously, but it also added to the weigh.

My next step here is to laser cut the gears in MDF or black plexiglass.  The weight of these will be supported by the wooden cabinet that will eventually contain all the guts of the simulacrum.

JONAH SAMSON | PLEASANTVILLE

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on December 12, 2010 at 1:45 am

PLEASANTVILLE

Jonah Samson, Peeping Tom, 2008

Current photographs from Jonah Samson are on display at G. Gibson Gallery in Seattle. The work is being shown as part of the exhibit, “View Master” along with Lori Nix and Grace Weston. The group show is very strong so be sure to see the gallery website for details.

Grave Digger, 2008

Samson creates dioramas in miniature and photographs the arrangements. The viewer is often the only witness to the moments the artist produces. The audience turns accomplice through their inability to act in the virtual world of “Pleasantville”. We become guilty bystanders helpless to alter events for better or worse.

Giant Octopus, 2008

All of the scenarios put forth in the exhibited series are plausible, save one. “Giant Octopus” (below) could be interpreted as an homage to Ray Harryhausen the special effects legend of “Clash of the Titans” and “The 7th Voyage of Sinbad” fame.

I discovered this great precedent today on a blog called Look Into My Owl.  (Awesome name)  I’m reprint their article here, but you should check out the site yourself, worth the time.

MFA Design & Technology Open Studio

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on November 11, 2010 at 3:56 pm

Nov 11th, 6 – 9PM, 10th floor lab
Food and beverages served!
FORMAL PARTICIPATION:
Students will present work-in-progress
with program director and other faculty.
INFORMAL PARTICIPATION:
Students will hang out and work on projects in the 10th floor lab and discuss your work and the program with prospective students and visitors.
___________________________________
I presented at open studio, which went pretty well I think.  I mostly got questions about the school and boot camp and that sort of thing.  It was good practice and Dave and Sven seemed to appreciate the project.