Jeanne Kelly

Posts Tagged ‘design’

Submedia | Concentric Zoetrope

In Uncategorized on February 8, 2011 at 1:15 am

A concentric zoetrope is essentially a cylinder within a  cylinder. The inner cylinder consists of images facing outward. The outer cylinder is solid except for small slits cut in evenly spaced increments around its circumference, like murder holes in the siege tower. These slits are what allow you to not just see the images on the inner cylinder, but they help to create the illusion animation.

For the second construction I needed to improve on the construction. I used much more flexible material.  I also enclosed the gaps along the bottom to create a solid backdrop in case I might want to use this for a standard zoetrope in the future.

The inner cylinder is supported by pressure.  I used the same images as in the first zoetrope for the reasons I stated in the first post, I want to concentrate on the mechanics. I recalculated the size of these images to fit the smaller cylinder and printed them out on the plotter. After taping the images into shape I measured the circumference of this new cylinder and cut to precise circles from foamcore to hold the cylinder rigid.

What I found to be as crucial in a concentric search rope as in the regular ones is lighting. Whereas the first one I made did not have enough light duty to its solid ceiling the second one seemed to have first have to much. Again I found that it was crucial not to have the outside of the mechanism lit.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19691830&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

I think the second one was pretty successful after watching the video and that doesn’t really do the piece justice. I really do think a lot of it is the lighting. And I am going to try and make the Tron face.

Also, here are a few of the “animation” from the Museum of the Moving Image.
http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19692479&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

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In Spring 2010, Thesis Research on January 31, 2011 at 11:39 am

The symposium “Modern a/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet” is being present in conjunction with  a new exhibition called “Working in Wonder” at the Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University. Here’s a bit of the press release:

“Working in Wonder,” a group exhibition, curated by Erin Gray, Danielle Schallom, and Edward Stapley-Brown, will be on view at The Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University from January 18 through February 11, 2011.

“Working in Wonder” includes artwork in various media by artists that have been inspired by the Curiosity Cabinet, a historical era of collecting occurring between 1500 and 1700. The exhibit explores the connection between man-made and natural objects or artificialia and naturalia.

A symposium, Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet, will take place in conjunction with the exhibition. Lawrence Weschler, author of Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, will give a keynote speech on “ A Natural History of Wonder.” Other speakers will discuss topics such as Joseph Cornell, The Morbid Anatomy Library, and the work of Damien Hirst. The symposium will be held on the first floor of the Walsh Library in the Beck Room directly across from the Walsh Gallery.

The Walsh Gallery is located on the campus of Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079. For more information call 973-275-2033 or jeanne.brasile@shu.edu. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10:30am to 4:30pm.

Please RSVP for the symposium by calling 973-761-7966 or emailing museumgrad@shu.edu. All events are free and open to the public.

There was a bit of confusion  (on my part)  as to whether or not the gallery would be open  during the symposium. Their normal operating hours do not include Saturdays. I confirmed with the University today that the Walsh Gallery and the “Working in Wonder” exhibition will indeed be open to the public during the symposium.

I thought I should also mention, that although I’ll be attending the entire symposium, anyone who would like to sit in for only one or two of the lectures, or would simply like to go to the gallery show, please  feel free to join us join us.

Update on the Seton Hall Symposium

In Thesis Research on January 31, 2011 at 11:39 am

The symposium “Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet” is being present in conjunction with  a new exhibition called “Working in Wonder” at the Walsh Gallery at Seton Hall University. Here’s a bit of the press release:

Paul Stout, The New American Landscape

“Working in Wonder” includes artwork in various media by artists that have been inspired by the Curiosity Cabinet, a historical era of collecting occurring between 1500 and 1700. The exhibit explores the connection between man-made and natural objects or artificialia and naturalia.

A symposium, Modern/Contemporary Art and the Curiosity Cabinet, will take place in conjunction with the exhibition. Lawrence Weschler, author of Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, will give a keynote speech on “ A Natural History of Wonder.” Other speakers will discuss topics such as Joseph Cornell, The Morbid Anatomy Library, and the work of Damien Hirst. The symposium will be held on the first floor of the Walsh Library in the Beck Room directly across from the Walsh Gallery.

The Walsh Gallery is located on the campus of Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079. For more information call 973-275-2033 or jeanne.brasile@shu.edu. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10:30am to 4:30pm.

Please RSVP for the symposium by calling 973-761-7966 or emailing museumgrad@shu.edu. All events are free and open to the public.

There was a bit of confusion  (on my part)  as to whether or not the gallery would be open  during the symposium. Their normal operating hours do not include Saturdays. I confirmed with the University today that the Walsh Gallery and the “Working in Wonder” exhibition will indeed be open to the public during the symposium.

I thought I should also mention, that although I’ll be attending the entire symposium, anyone who would like to sit in for only one or two of the lectures, or would simply like to go to the gallery show, please  feel free to join us join us.

Kickstarter Video

In Spring 2010, Thesis Research on January 29, 2011 at 6:48 pm

I wanted to make a video for the project home page on Kickstarter. There is so much to read on there already that it was suggested something a little more dynamic would be nice. And sometimes it’s just nice to be told a story while you look at pictures.  🙂 So I finally got it completed, up and running. click on the image below to watch the video.

 

Submedia | Zoetropes

In Spring 2010 on January 27, 2011 at 9:14 pm

For the warm up to really understanding how the Zoetropes work I’m making one or more.  I started with a simple copypaper prototype fashioned after Josh Spodek’s simple plastic one. Not so successful because the material was too flimsy and there was no smooth way to spin it quickly.  The breakdown of space and time however did work, so now it’s just a mater of better material and better images.

I was thinking about how similar zoetropes are to some animated gifs.  The example Josh showed us and the one I created after that one both had 12 images and 12 slits between them. I knew that a few of my favorite gifs have only 12 frames. I decided to rotoscope one, print it and use it as test images for the next zoetrope construction.  Most of you will recognize it. If not, then go to I Am Not An Artist and look at a few other great little animated gifs. You’ll find the original there.

Next up …

Muybridge’s Galloping Horse

Submedia | The First Zoetropes

In Spring 2010 on January 27, 2011 at 9:14 pm

To truly understand how zoetropes work you have to just make one or two.   (or twenty 🙂

I started with a simple copypaper prototype fashioned after Josh Spodek’s small plastic example. Not so successfully though; the material was too flimsy and there was no smooth way to spin it quickly.  The breakdown of space and time however did work. The slots, although being slightly various in width, seem to work well. Ideally I think they should be completely uniform. So, by the end of class it seemed to be just a matter of better materials and better images.

On my subway ride home I began to think about how analogous zoetropes are to animated gifs, each containing very few frames and usually viewed in the loop.  Although the two mediums are vastly different, the images and optical effects they create are very similar.

The example Josh showed us, and the one I created in class after that (the first image above/with new and improved dots),  both had 12 images and 12 slits between them. I knew that a few of my favorite gifs also have only 12 frames. I decided to rotoscope one, print the images and use them to test the next zoetrope construction.  Some of you will recognize it. If not, then go to I Am Not An Artist to check out a few other little gems along with the original of the one above.

I have to say that usually when I’m learning a new technology, medium or skill I try to focus on learning just that. Creativity, for me  at least, can sometimes get in the way of  learning the left brain stuff. So I try to stick with something simple in concept, that way I’m less likely to get distracted by being creative. I find this method works best for me. Once I know and understand the technology then I can go crazy in the creative department, no holds barred.

Next up, Muybridge’s Galloping Horse.

I chose this series of stills to also test the zoetrope.  It’s a reference I’m familiar with and I know that it works as an animation in several formats. So my reasoning goes: if these images don’t work then it will mean that it is the fault of the mechanism more than likely, not due to poor rotoscoping or poor animation on my part. This makes a good measure against the machine.

Using the lazy susan that serves as my spice rack from my kitchen cabinet as the spinning mechanism, I could concentrate on the aspects of the outside cylinder: deciding on the slats, how many I would need, and how wide each opening needed to be. I use  black foam core I had on hand to construct the outer cylinder.

Because foamcore can’t be bent into a smooth circle I instead

cut “planks” and evenly spaced them around a circumference of the lazy susan.  I had to create a way to keep the “planks” together at the top however; they had a tendency to spread open as soon as the lazy susan was spun. Again I used materials I found on hand, straightening out paperclips and punching them through the slats to attach to an inner ring at the top.

This solution caused its own problems,  blocking out most of the light needed to see the animation.  I attempted different forms of lighting to compensate for this “ceiling” as you can see in the video below but nothing was quite successful enough in my opinion.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19663037&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=615b80&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Another thing I discovered in constructing this first zoetrope was the slats had to be closed when the images were. Meaning no light should be allowed to breakthrough between the images. As you can see in the video, what your eye is most drawn to is the flash of light coming through the back of the zoetrope.  this is easily fixed by wrapping the outside in a sheet of black paper. For my next construction I will simply only cut the slots halfway down.

Prototyping the Diorama | 3D

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on January 17, 2011 at 11:10 pm

NOW IN COLOR!

I decided to keep test the 3d images, especially I can not get the stereolithography done for the final piece.  I’ve worked in Klean Klay before, it’s the primary  material used in 3d forensic facial reconstruction.  If I’m able to get one of the Hyrtl skulls printed I’ll used this to do a true reconstruction, but it’s no good for createing the tiny diorama pieces. Too soft and not permanent.  Instead I’m testing several different material that might be a substitute for print 3d.  Remember this guy?  If you’ve been checking out the Thesis Page (the tab at the top there ^, after Home and About) then you would have seen the post on this prototype.

This was my first attempt at sculpy. I’d never worked in the material before and found it difficult at beat to get any significant detail at the small scale I have to work in. You can see more photos of those below at 11/04.

I then attended a puppet show at HERE Art Center called “the Fortune Teller”

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=14192604&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=615b80&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

I loved the look of the puppets and of course immediately wanted to make a puppet show.  That’ll  be next on the list. 🙂  I was able to go back stage after the show and see the construction close up.  I asked a lot of questions and decide to give “cell-u-clay” a try.  That was the material used to create the puppets. I felt the scale might still be a bit tight for the material, but I tried it anyway.

Sketching the Cabinet

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on January 17, 2011 at 8:43 pm

I thought I post some of the sketches and ideas for the cabinet that will house the diorama, camera, lights, and all the guts of the simulacrum.

These are not complete, but just sketches.  I’m not a arcitect or draftsman, I’m not sure how to draw them as blueprints.  Luckily I know of a few folks who have been kind enough to help out in this department. I’ve also briefly discussed this with with Jim Rogers, the master cabinet maker (and my brother-in-law 😉 who’s going to be building this for me if I’m able to come up with the funding.  He’s not asking for much and in return I’m willing to give him some space to add his own creative touch.

I’ve played around with the idea of using a planetary gear on the bottom of the diorama table.  I think this is going to be the most stable.  And from the testing I can see right away that the sketches below don’t leave enough room between the camera and the closest focal point within the scenes. That has to be redesigned to accommodate about a foot of clearance. I’ll update when I have something substacial to post.  Until then, I’m sure you can get a good idea the direction I’m head from the previous posts, the Thesis page (^tab at the top) and these drawings.

Think steampunk, that should help.  😉

Testing the Follow Focus

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on January 17, 2011 at 5:35 pm

The follow focus on the simulacrum is being built with a help of a friend and photographer Louis Lucci.  We set it a few times now and ran some test and took the measurements for the cabinet based on the dementions of the rig and the diorama table together.  I’ve tried a few different mounts and while I think the Skil mount is best for movement, it will not support the weight of the follow focus.

The video is recorded directly through the camera and streamed live into the living room.  No great feat, but no small accomplishment either.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=18201661&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=e8e8e8&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

The ruler allows me to get a better idea about placement and focus when setting up the dioramas. This also lets me see how much space has to exists between the camera and the diorama.  Right now the measurement looks to be around one to two and half feet from lens to the closest focal point in the scene, close to what I expected.

This second video is the documentation of that test.  Louis and I are taking the measurements and also getting an idea how the scene changes when view in a different way.
http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=18196453&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=e8e8e8&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

I had a real heart wrenching moment the second time we set up the entire rig.

I had returned to my family home in Virginia over the holiday to pick up some of my mother’s camera equipment to use in the project. My mother was a photographer and my best friend. She died on May 1st, 2005 at the age of 66; too young with too much undone.  I decided to take back a two tripods, a few lens and filters with some other odds and ends to use in the prototyping.  I carefully separated out the things I’d used and backed them up to return to New York with me.  The one thing I took that was particularly special to me was her 50 mm lens.  This one has a lot of very fond memories attached to it for me.

Louis had been setting everything up while I was in another room working on the diorama.  When I finally saw it all put together with my mom’s lens, I just cried.

I’m just so happy to be using it and I knew she would be thrilled with what I was doing and would have been right beside me helping if she could. In a way it made me feel like I was still able to include her and at the same time it made me sad that she couldn’t be here.  I miss you mom ad this one’s for you all the way.

and a side note:

This 90° gear is found inside the main compartment of the follow focus. It’s pretty substantial and it’s actually just what I need for the crank to shaft in the final build as well.

Prototyping the Mechanism

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on January 16, 2011 at 11:06 pm

Geometry and Gears

I had not used this particular set of tools in a long time and it felt good to get them out and work with geometry again. I got this set during my second year in college and it has more then past the test of time, that extension are is perfect for this job.

The first few prototypes for the turntable’s gearing where pretty unsuccessful.  My biggest problem is simply making something sturdy enough. I was given a great book for beginners in gears and simple analog mechanical movements.  This helped with understanding the basics and getting started with figuring out the ratio.  I also had to start thinking about the placement and accessibility of the handle and how each user is going to experience the function.

Coat-hangers, cardboard and foam-core don’t seem to cut it, they’re all too flimsy to last longer then a few turns and even those struggle to move the diorama.  Nothing I’ve put together so far moves very smoothly, but that’s the point of prototyping, right?  I like the 1:1 ration for rith now, it’s more intuitive to “scroll” through the scenes at this 1:1 movement.

I also decided to allow the gears to work in both directions.  This allows the viewer to “rewind” the narrative.  They can return to what they have already seen or actually view the entire thing in revere. This is one less restriction to the narrative.

There is no question that I’m going to need the construction to be much more substantial.  Not only to support the weight of the diorama itself, but to support the force required to also turn the thing smoothly and effortlessly.  In the second or third iteration of the gears I replace all the cardboard shafts with wooden ones.  This improved the stability and tremendously, but it also added to the weigh.

My next step here is to laser cut the gears in MDF or black plexiglass.  The weight of these will be supported by the wooden cabinet that will eventually contain all the guts of the simulacrum.