Jeanne Kelly

Posts Tagged ‘old school’

Google Art Project | As an Artist

In Thesis Research, Wow on February 14, 2011 at 12:27 pm

I think this is brilliant, wonderful.

Who ever gets to see these works of art this up close?

Very few people are allowed to study these collections in this way. And rightly so. Too many visitors getting as close as Google Art Project does would destroy a work of art in no time. Yet it’s one of those many things I want to do in museums that’s not allowed; getting up close and studying the hand of the artist.

I learn a lot from being up close. I used to look at engraving stones and etching plates with a magnifying glass. But that was my own work. I love that I can now see these in this works of art way.

But I’m interested to hear what the museums and galleries have to say. There will never be a replacement for the original, but when the original isn’t avalible and certainly can’t be examined this closely by a million people all the time. [that would surely destroy it]   A certain distance is important for the life and health of the work and the viewer. In a way, the fragility of the piece, the unique nature of it being a one of a kind, gives it a life we must protect. There will never be another van Gogh’s The Bedroom and I may never be able to get it.

If museums get really desperate, they could sell personal viewings to a few people to help them pay the rent. But a few other people might get angry over that, maybe the people who couldn’t afford it.

Seems to me a double edged sword. A museum’s greatest competition can be the wealthy elite. They drive and sustain the price of art; they are who the museums bid against.  At the same time, they provide free labor, funding and donate entire collections to museums. Tricky, tricky. I understand that I’m oversimplifying a complex problem, but I think it has a simple relevance here. Who gets what kind of access?

And, what’s in the best interest of the work?  Should everyone, no one, only a few people a year, be allowed to get breath on Rembrandt’s Self Portrait. Whatever the right answer, Google says it’s everyone.

For now the following museums are included in the project:

  • Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, Washington DC – USA
  • The Frick Collection, NYC – USA
  • Gemäldegalerie, Berlin – Germany
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC – USA
  • MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art, NYC – USA
  • Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid – Spain
  • Museo Thyssen – Bornemisza, Madrid – Spain
  • Museum Kampa, Prague – Czech Republic
  • National Gallery, London – UK
  • Palace of Versailles – France
  • Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
  • The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg – Russia
  • State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow – Russia
  • Tate Britain, London – UK
  • Uffizi Gallery, Florence – Italy
  • Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam – The Netherlands
Here’s a little more about it in Google’s own words:
What is the ‘Art Project’?
A unique collaboration with some of the world’s most acclaimed art museums to enable people to discover and view more than a thousand artworks online in extraordinary detail.

  • Explore museums with Street View technology:virtually move around the museum’s galleries, selecting works of art that interest you, navigate though interactive floor plans and learn more about the museum and you explore.
  • Artwork View: discover featured artworks at high resolution and use the custom viewer to zoom into paintings. Expanding the info panel allows you to read more about an artwork, find more works by that artist and watch related YouTube videos.
  • Create your own collection: the ‘Create an Artwork Collection’ feature allows you to save specific views of any of the 1000+ artworks and build your own personalised collection. Comments can be added to each painting and the whole collection can then be shared with friends and family.
Are the images on the Art Project site copyright protected?
The high resolution imagery of artworks featured on the art project site are owned by the museums, and these images may be subject to copyright laws around the world. The Street View imagery is owned by Google. All of the imagery on this site is provided for the sole purpose of enabling you to use and enjoy the benefit of the art project site, in the manner permitted by Google’s Terms of Service.The normal Google Terms of Service apply to your use of the entire site.
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Submedia | Concentric Zoetrope

In Uncategorized on February 8, 2011 at 1:15 am

A concentric zoetrope is essentially a cylinder within a  cylinder. The inner cylinder consists of images facing outward. The outer cylinder is solid except for small slits cut in evenly spaced increments around its circumference, like murder holes in the siege tower. These slits are what allow you to not just see the images on the inner cylinder, but they help to create the illusion animation.

For the second construction I needed to improve on the construction. I used much more flexible material.  I also enclosed the gaps along the bottom to create a solid backdrop in case I might want to use this for a standard zoetrope in the future.

The inner cylinder is supported by pressure.  I used the same images as in the first zoetrope for the reasons I stated in the first post, I want to concentrate on the mechanics. I recalculated the size of these images to fit the smaller cylinder and printed them out on the plotter. After taping the images into shape I measured the circumference of this new cylinder and cut to precise circles from foamcore to hold the cylinder rigid.

What I found to be as crucial in a concentric search rope as in the regular ones is lighting. Whereas the first one I made did not have enough light duty to its solid ceiling the second one seemed to have first have to much. Again I found that it was crucial not to have the outside of the mechanism lit.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19691830&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

I think the second one was pretty successful after watching the video and that doesn’t really do the piece justice. I really do think a lot of it is the lighting. And I am going to try and make the Tron face.

Also, here are a few of the “animation” from the Museum of the Moving Image.
http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19692479&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Submedia | Zoetropes

In Spring 2010 on January 27, 2011 at 9:14 pm

For the warm up to really understanding how the Zoetropes work I’m making one or more.  I started with a simple copypaper prototype fashioned after Josh Spodek’s simple plastic one. Not so successful because the material was too flimsy and there was no smooth way to spin it quickly.  The breakdown of space and time however did work, so now it’s just a mater of better material and better images.

I was thinking about how similar zoetropes are to some animated gifs.  The example Josh showed us and the one I created after that one both had 12 images and 12 slits between them. I knew that a few of my favorite gifs have only 12 frames. I decided to rotoscope one, print it and use it as test images for the next zoetrope construction.  Most of you will recognize it. If not, then go to I Am Not An Artist and look at a few other great little animated gifs. You’ll find the original there.

Next up …

Muybridge’s Galloping Horse

Submedia | The First Zoetropes

In Spring 2010 on January 27, 2011 at 9:14 pm

To truly understand how zoetropes work you have to just make one or two.   (or twenty 🙂

I started with a simple copypaper prototype fashioned after Josh Spodek’s small plastic example. Not so successfully though; the material was too flimsy and there was no smooth way to spin it quickly.  The breakdown of space and time however did work. The slots, although being slightly various in width, seem to work well. Ideally I think they should be completely uniform. So, by the end of class it seemed to be just a matter of better materials and better images.

On my subway ride home I began to think about how analogous zoetropes are to animated gifs, each containing very few frames and usually viewed in the loop.  Although the two mediums are vastly different, the images and optical effects they create are very similar.

The example Josh showed us, and the one I created in class after that (the first image above/with new and improved dots),  both had 12 images and 12 slits between them. I knew that a few of my favorite gifs also have only 12 frames. I decided to rotoscope one, print the images and use them to test the next zoetrope construction.  Some of you will recognize it. If not, then go to I Am Not An Artist to check out a few other little gems along with the original of the one above.

I have to say that usually when I’m learning a new technology, medium or skill I try to focus on learning just that. Creativity, for me  at least, can sometimes get in the way of  learning the left brain stuff. So I try to stick with something simple in concept, that way I’m less likely to get distracted by being creative. I find this method works best for me. Once I know and understand the technology then I can go crazy in the creative department, no holds barred.

Next up, Muybridge’s Galloping Horse.

I chose this series of stills to also test the zoetrope.  It’s a reference I’m familiar with and I know that it works as an animation in several formats. So my reasoning goes: if these images don’t work then it will mean that it is the fault of the mechanism more than likely, not due to poor rotoscoping or poor animation on my part. This makes a good measure against the machine.

Using the lazy susan that serves as my spice rack from my kitchen cabinet as the spinning mechanism, I could concentrate on the aspects of the outside cylinder: deciding on the slats, how many I would need, and how wide each opening needed to be. I use  black foam core I had on hand to construct the outer cylinder.

Because foamcore can’t be bent into a smooth circle I instead

cut “planks” and evenly spaced them around a circumference of the lazy susan.  I had to create a way to keep the “planks” together at the top however; they had a tendency to spread open as soon as the lazy susan was spun. Again I used materials I found on hand, straightening out paperclips and punching them through the slats to attach to an inner ring at the top.

This solution caused its own problems,  blocking out most of the light needed to see the animation.  I attempted different forms of lighting to compensate for this “ceiling” as you can see in the video below but nothing was quite successful enough in my opinion.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=19663037&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=615b80&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Another thing I discovered in constructing this first zoetrope was the slats had to be closed when the images were. Meaning no light should be allowed to breakthrough between the images. As you can see in the video, what your eye is most drawn to is the flash of light coming through the back of the zoetrope.  this is easily fixed by wrapping the outside in a sheet of black paper. For my next construction I will simply only cut the slots halfway down.

Hyrtl Simulacrum Planning

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on November 7, 2010 at 5:57 pm

The Year of the Dragon

In Fall 2010 on October 2, 2010 at 2:16 pm

Just a new piece I’m doing inspired by my partner in crime Christopher Abell.  It’s taken a while to even get it this far, and with thesis going on, it’ll be a while be for it’s done.  Chris has an idea about a baby dragon story, somewhere in there I changed to a baby dragon puppet growing up as her people grow up.  The story will probably change a million times because neither one of use will write the darn thing down.  High on the Projects list though.

In the end it will be a college, 12″x 42″.  I’m making it these strange dimension to replace a print I framed when I was production manager at a custom frame shop.  I love the frame and the mat, glass and all the materials are archival.  And as you can see the piece is pretty predominant in my home.

Domain Maps

In Fall 2010, Thesis Research on September 30, 2010 at 4:34 pm

I cleaned it up a bit in photoshop and color coded the nodes.  I also applied a distortion that I don’t especially like aesthetically, but it’s hierarchically more accurate.  I’ll have to take that into consideration for the next map

My second iteration on the Domain Map (above) is pretty different.  This map is much more “me”.  It also reflects the research I’ve been doing, adding important domains such as Cultural Informatics and Interactive Narrative.  There is less of an emphasis on the “hardware” yet this map shows the specifics as well and the larger domains.

I put together my first domain map (above) just to get started with the obvious and get it visual.  I was just starting to get deeper in my research, but I think now maybe I was stuck a bit to much in defining form.

Concept Mapping | Round One

In Fall 2010 on September 30, 2010 at 4:01 pm

The Concept

Now on to Round Two: The Form

YUKI

In Fall 2010 on September 21, 2010 at 9:20 pm

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6620739&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=ffffff&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0
via  QNQ/AUJIK on Vimeo.

THIS IS WHAT YOU SHALL DO

In Wow on July 24, 2010 at 12:45 am
The first printing of Leaves of Grass (and none of the subsequent printings) had a preface with the following quote:

“This is what you shall do: Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.”

something to aspire to